The Red Shoe Movement in Canada: on Tuesdays, wear red shoes to work!

The Red Shoe Movement in Canada

Women in Canada account for 50.4% of the population (1) who live in a tolerant and multi-cultural society. However, there are important issues with professional women in the country:
- “Women account only for 14.4 per cent of all 3,992 board seats at Canada’s 500 largest organizations”, Closing the resource-sector gender gap

- “Visible minorities account for 4.6 per cent of directors, while people with disabilities hold only 2.7 per cent of seats and aboriginal people fill 1.1 per cent of seats..” Closing the resource-sector gender gap

- “Untapped potential — The $174 billion bonus
Canada has significant untapped potential since there is still considerable room to successfully integrate immigrants and women into the economy. The cost of doing nothing amounts to billions of dollars in lost incomes”, The Diversity Advantage: A Case for Canada’s 21st Century Economy

- “….the gap in income between men and women in Canada is 21 per cent…”, Gender Income Gap

As women, we need to work on diminishing/eliminating the barriers that still affecting women in the 21st century. I met Mariela Dabbah last month at the #LATISM12 Conference in the US and had an instant connection with her Red Shoe Movement:

“By wearing your red shoes to work on Tuesdays (and whenever possible) and letting people know that you support the Red Shoe Movement (RSM), you will not only establish yourself as a supporter of women but also inspire other women to join the movement”.

As we grow in the professional world, we need to support talented women regardless of their ethnic group, because it’s about “women supporting women”to build a better society for the generations to come.

The #RedShoeMovement is about Empowerment and developing leadership and teamwork skills for diverse and talented females!

About The Red Shoe Movement

If you are ready to prove that women can help other women become powerful, join Mariela Dabbah and the Red Shoe Movement! Wear your red shoes to work on Tuesdays to signal your support for other women’s career goals. Men can wear Red Ties to show support!

What is it?
As her book Poder de Mujer: Descubre quién eres para crear el éxito a tu medida (Woman Power: Discover who you are to tailor your success) came out, Mariela Dabbah, award-winning best-selling author, launched a movement to encourage women to support other women in fulfilling their career goals.

How does it work?
By wearing your red shoes to work on Tuesdays (and whenever possible) and letting people know that you support the Red Shoe Movement (RSM), you will not only establish yourself as a supporter of women but also inspire other women to join the movement. It’s very likely that the sheer peer pressure will drive a new conversation at work about women supporting one another.

What are the principles behind the movement?
If you decide to join Mariela Dabbah and the Red Shoe Movement, we ask that you include the RSM Logo on your Facebook page and that you adhere to a few simple principles:

• Refrain from bad-mouthing other women
• Avoid using labels that contribute to stereotype women
• Mentor younger or less experienced women whenever you have a chance
• Offer opportunities to women who are eager to learn and open to feedback
• Provide honest feedback to women in your network, and avoid hurtful comments or unnecessary criticism
• Cultivate your relationship with women on your team
• Celebrate selflessly the accomplishments of other women

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This entry was posted in #LATISM12, Because I Am a Gril, Career Management, Diversity, Global Latin American, International Day of the Girl Child, Red Shoe Movement. Bookmark the permalink.

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